I don’t care, you fool. Get out of my way. I’ll break it down myself.

(Source: mickeyandcompany, via smileuponthestars)

aimalyn:

leannewoodfull:

huffingtonpost:

This Man With Severe Cerebral Palsy Created Mind-Blowing Art Using Just A Typewriter

Last year, 22-time Emmy award-winning reporter John Stofflet posted this news video he created for KING-TV in 2004, featuring Paul Smith and his artistic talents.

See the full video to see more of Smith’s artworks and to learn more about his inspiring story go here. 

Absolutely amazing.

I’ve seen his work on tumblr before but never with his credit attached to it. 

(via thissorrowfullife)

tastefullyoffensive:

The Wisconsin Humane Society is really good at naming kittens. [via]

tastefullyoffensive:

The Wisconsin Humane Society is really good at naming kittens. [via]

thecutestofthecute:

BREAKING NEWS!! DOGS IN PAJAMAS I REPEAT, DOGS!! IN. PAJAMAS!!

(via size10plz)

slayboybunny:

i refuse to be shamed for having a body. i refuse to get embarrassed when a tampon falls out of my purse or spend a whole day anxious about if someones going to notice that i forgot to shave a patch of leg hair. i wasnt put on this earth to spend my time apologizing for my existence and i refuse to let anyone make me feel like i have to waste my energy on all that petty shit

(via size10plz)

sadcyberbaby:

Undercover S/S 2015

sadcyberbaby:

Undercover S/S 2015

(via fashionfrappe)

asylum-art:

Devon  Dorrityon Sculptures

website | deviantART | Facebook

Devon Dorrity is an award-winning fantasy figure sculptor based out of  Mountain Green, Utah. His sculptures have been featured in Spectrum 20: The Best in Contemporary Fantastic Art, ImagineFX: June 2014, and in The Museum of American Illustration’s Spectrum Exhibit in September 2014.

Devon started sculpting seriously in 2012 after being invited to attend a modeling session at Adonis Bronze by Dennis Smith.

His first finished piece was a 78” monument sized figurative piece entitled Queen of the Seas. It is a Cecaelia, a mythical human octopus hybrid creature. Then several other sculptures followed including The Sorceress and Wood Nymph.

(via fashionfrappe)

frankierosbuttblog:

this will never not be funny

frankierosbuttblog:

this will never not be funny

(Source: winterexists, via smileuponthestars)

completelylostprincess:

nofreedomlove:

image

image

image

imageimage

image

image

image

Source

"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

This is so beautiful.

(via size10plz)

iguanamouth:

she just stood there doing this little dance until we got up

(via maybegee)